A Most Engaging Legislative Proposal

Article 11 / 11 , Vol 46 No. 2 (Summer)

A Most Engaging Legislative Proposal

Although a hard-working parliamentarian might be said to be “married to their job,” they may hope to enter a more romantic form of union during their time in office – and indeed, maybe even in the Chamber! But, is such a proposal in order according to Bourinot? Can there be a new Act of Union? Will a parliamentary page be the ring bearer? Of course, none of this really matters to the two people who, for a brief moment, become the sole focus of every eye in the Chamber. Unlike the normal Question Period (which we are reminded again and again is not called Answer Period), when a parliamentarian pops the question to their partner from the floor of the Assembly, they will be waiting with bated breath to hear a definitive response. In this article, the author outlines some occasions when everlasting love was a standing order.

Charlie Feldman

Continue reading “A Most Engaging Legislative Proposal”

Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice

Article 2 / 10 , Vol 44 No. 4 (Winter)

Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice

Charlie Feldman is the President of the Canadian Study of Parliament Group and a member of the Law Society of Ontario. Any views expressed in this piece are his own and not those of any employer.

Continue reading “Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice”

A Counting Conundrum: How Many Amendments?

Article 4 / 11 , Vol 44 No. 1 (Spring)

A Counting Conundrum: How Many Amendments?

Charlie Feldman is a Member of the Law Society of Ontario.

There’s more than one way to count amendments depending on how you define the term. In this article, the author explores a myriad of possibilities using hypothetical examples. However, he concludes by noting that counting the number of amendments is not necessarily the best metric to assess the extent of change in legislation.

Continue reading “A Counting Conundrum: How Many Amendments?”

An Update from the Canadian Study of Parliament Group

Article 7 / 13 , Vol 43 No 4 (Winter)

An Update from the Canadian Study of Parliament Group

Finding a silver-lining in the COVID-19 pandemic is difficult, but not impossible. The necessity of moving conferences and seminars to digital platforms has opened up new possibilities for participation. In this article, the author explains how the CSPG’s recent virtual offerings have expanded the range of presenters able to participate and created some exciting and informative events.

The Canadian Study of Parliament Group (CSPG) has begun hosting virtual events in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In October, our annual conference entitled “Perspectives on Legislatures and Legislative Power: Past, Present, Future” brought together presenters from five continents to share their experiences and insights on various aspects of parliamentary institutions. It was the largest and most ambitious CSPG program yet – and the CSPG hopes to build on this with its upcoming seminar programs.

Continue reading “An Update from the Canadian Study of Parliament Group”

CSPG Seminar: The #MeToo Movement and Parliament

Article 10 / 14 , Vol 42 No. 3 (Fall)

CSPG Seminar: The #MeToo Movement and Parliament

The #MeToo movement has been a watershed moment for changes to workplace culture, particularly for women in fields traditionally dominated by men. On March 29, 2019, the Canadian Study of Parliament Group held a seminar to explore the impact of the #MeToo on parties, politics, and Parliament Hill.

Charlie Feldman
Continue reading “CSPG Seminar: The #MeToo Movement and Parliament”

Parliamentary Business Seminar on Parliamentary Diplomacy

Article 7 / 11 , Vol 42 No. 1 (Spring)

Parliamentary Business Seminar on Parliamentary Diplomacy

On Friday, November 16, 2018, the Canadian Study of Parliament Group held a Parliamentary Business Seminar on Parliamentary Diplomacy, inviting experts to discuss various aspects of parliamentary involvement in foreign affairs. One panel explored how parliamentary diplomacy occurs in Canada while a second panel gathered current and former parliamentarians who participated in parliamentary diplomacy to offer their personal and professional reflections.

Paul EJ Thomas and Charlie Feldman

Continue reading “Parliamentary Business Seminar on Parliamentary Diplomacy”

All Together Now: Government Bill Bundling in the 42nd Parliament

Article 12 / 15 , Vol 41 No. 4 (Winter)

All Together Now: Government Bill Bundling in the 42nd Parliament

Bill bundling – the reintroduction of all the substantive provisions of a bill without any modification in another bill – has been used on several occasions by the government during the 42nd Parliament, 1st Session. In this article, the author notes that this method of packaging a legislative agenda is somewhat unusual and warrants further consideration from a legislative planning perspective. He explains that while combining or consolidating related matters into one bill maximizes efficiency, the introduction of government legislation carries with it a myriad of legal and practical consequences beyond the Senate and House of Commons, some of which are heightened when bills are bundled. The author suggests that the recent trend of bill bundling is linked to recognition of the limited time in the legislative calendar before the next scheduled election. However, if bill bundling becomes a more common practice in future parliaments, some questions about predictability and consistency of a legislative agenda should be considered.

Introduction

Continue reading “All Together Now: Government Bill Bundling in the 42nd Parliament”

Parliamentary Timing and Federal Legislation Referred to Courts: Reconsidering C-14

Article 5 / 12 , Vol 40 No 2 (Summer)

Parliamentary Timing and Federal Legislation Referred to Courts: Reconsidering C-14

Parliamentarians often express the desire to obtain the opinion of the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of bills. For example, parliamentarians thought of asking for the Supreme Court’s opinion in the recent Bill C-14 on medical aid to die. In this article, the author analyzes six contexts of hypothetical referral of Bill C-14: pre-filing, simultaneous referral to filing, post-filing referral, post-adoption referral, adoption Conditional on removal and referral to provincial courts. The conclusion is that while legislators want a court decision on the constitutionality of a bill, complications arise because the executive controls the current referral powers. Therefore,

Continue reading “Parliamentary Timing and Federal Legislation Referred to Courts: Reconsidering C-14”

Top