Governing by Time Allocation: The Increasing Use of Time Allocation in the House of Commons, 1971 to 2021

Article 1 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

Governing by Time Allocation: The Increasing Use of Time Allocation in the House of Commons, 1971 to 2021

In its Winter 2000–2001 issue, the Canadian Parliamentary Review published the first study on the use of Standing Order 78 (commonly known as “time allocation”) in the House of Commons. “Silencing Parliamentary Democracy or Effective Time Management? Time Allocation in the House of Commons” chronicles the use of time allocation between December 1971 and June 2000. This article by the same author provides an update on the use of time allocation in the two subsequent decades, thus covering the periods from the 28th Parliament (1968–1971) to the 43rd Parliament (2019–2021).

Continue reading “Governing by Time Allocation: The Increasing Use of Time Allocation in the House of Commons, 1971 to 2021”

Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice

Article 2 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice

Charlie Feldman is the President of the Canadian Study of Parliament Group and a member of the Law Society of Ontario. Any views expressed in this piece are his own and not those of any employer.

Continue reading “Unfinished Business: A Snapshot of Recent Government Bill Practice”

(Re)Building Behaviour: How the B.C. Chamber Influences Politics, and How B.C. MLAs Want to Change It

Article 3 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

(Re)Building Behaviour: How the B.C. Chamber Influences Politics, and How B.C. MLAs Want to Change It

Rachel McMillan and Abby Koning are 2021 B.C Legislative Interns.

Continue reading “(Re)Building Behaviour: How the B.C. Chamber Influences Politics, and How B.C. MLAs Want to Change It”

New and Notable Titles

Article 5 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

New and Notable Titles

Bilodeau, Roger. “Canada’s judicial appointment process / Le processus des nominations à la magistrature au Canada.” Journal of Parliamentary and Political Law / Revue de droit parlementaire et politique 15 (3): 465-, September/septembre 2021.

  • The recent appointment of the Honorable Justice Mahmud Jamal to the Supreme Court of Canada provides an opportunity to take stock of and reflect on the state of judicial appointments in Canada. … En raison du fait que la Cour suprême du Canada traite des appels en français et en anglais, que les plaidoiries écrites peuvent être soumises dans l’une ou l’autre langue officielle, et que les avocats et avocates peuvent plaider dans la langue officielle de leur choix, on s’attend qu’un juge de cette cour puisse lire des documents et comprendre une plaidoirie sans devoir recourir à la traduction ou à l’interprétation. Idéalement, le juge doit pouvoir discuter avec un avocat pendant une plaidoirie et avec les autres juges de la Cour en français ou en anglais.

Continue reading “New and Notable Titles”

Messaging, Partisanship and Politics: Discourse in Standing Committees in a Minority Parliament

Article 6 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

Messaging, Partisanship and Politics: Discourse in Standing Committees in a Minority Parliament

Valere Gaspard is a graduate student at the University of Ottawa, a research fellow at Western University’s Leadership and Democracy Lab, and an alumnus of the Parliamentary Internship Programme (2020-2021). This is a revised version of the essay he wrote as part of his internship.

Continue reading “Messaging, Partisanship and Politics: Discourse in Standing Committees in a Minority Parliament”

Nothing About Us Without Us: Representation of People with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Interests in Parliament

Article 7 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

Nothing About Us Without Us: Representation of People with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Interests in Parliament

Amélie Cossette is a 2020-2021 Parliamentary intern. She holds an honours bachelor’s degree in Conflict Studies and Human Rights from the University of Ottawa and is currently pursuing a Masters degree in Fundamental Rights at Université Laval. As someone who has a loved one with an intellectual disability, she suggests that this research project be read, in part, as a heartfelt plea for an ableist society to do better.

Continue reading “Nothing About Us Without Us: Representation of People with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Interests in Parliament”

CPA Activities

Article 8 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

CPA Activities

New Nova Scotia Speaker

Victoria-The Lakes MLA Keith Bain was elected Speaker of the Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly on September 24. The long-time Progressive Conservative MLA, who was nominated by Premier Tim Houston, defeated New Democratic MLA Lisa Lachance. The vote took longer than usual as MLAs present lined up in groups to cast ballots in recognition of COVID-19 restrictions.

Continue reading “CPA Activities”

A Quebec political dynasty: the David family

Article 10 / 10 , Vol 44 no 4 (Winter)

A Quebec political dynasty: the David family

Few families fit the definition of a “political dynasty” better than the David family. For over 100 years now, the family has left their mark on Quebec and Canadian politics.

Laurent-Olivier David (1840–1926), a lawyer and newspaper editor, was elected as the Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Quebec for Montreal East in 1886. He did not seek re-election in 1890. Laurent-Olivier was defeated in Montreal East in the 1891 federal election and in Napierville in the 1892 provincial election. Appointed as senator for the senatorial division of Mille-Isles in 1903, Laurent-Olivier remained in office until his death.

Continue reading “A Quebec political dynasty: the David family”

Top